Posted by: charityinfo | January 27, 2012

Over 150 Years Ago….

Over 150 years ago a man saw the rise of homeless children in New York City and took action. In 1853, Charles Loring Brace founded the Orphan Train Movement.  This involved moving children off the city streets of New York to a more family environment in the homes of farming families in the West.

It was the start of the present day Children’s Aid Society. The society’s work is focused in 5 boroughs of New York City and Westchester County. This charitable institution’s mission is to help children in poverty to succeed and thrive.  While this is a short mission statement, it encompasses a broad coverage of a child’s life. Hence the organization serves adolescents, early childhood, and parents. While parents are not exactly children, it is basically through them that a child has a good chance of succeeding in life.

There are various programs in each of the groups served. While the organization is over 150 years old, its programs have kept up with the times and are not based on old practices. In fact many of the organization’s initiatives have been adopted nationally and internationally including, the influence on the present day foster care program, the free lunch program, and day care centers for working mothers.

The society’s activities range from prenatal care to college and job preparatory training programs.  There are many stories of how this institution has helped families. With its stringent financial approach and cutting-edge solutions to child care problems, it won’t be a surprise if this endeavor will be around for another 150 years.

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